Anthony’s blog

The views, opinions and positions expressed within this blog are those of the author alone. The accuracy, completeness and validity of any statements made within this article are not guaranteed. We accept no liability for any errors or omissions.

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Bumblebee maths

At Bumblebee Conservation Trust, we regularly hear different numbers being quoted for the ‘Number of bumblebee species in the UK’. The confusion is caused by the subtractions, additions and even multiplications of species. Let’s go through the figures, showing the working like any good maths student should.

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Teaching children about bumblebees

Part of my job involves hosting stalls at fairs, shows and other places. I recently attended a special day for environmental organisations at the ‘Our Dynamic Earth’ attraction in Edinburgh. ODE is a very popular attraction that aims to teach people – especially children – about the earth, including geology, ecosystems, space, etc. It gave me then an opportunity to meet a new, large audience, to spread the word about the plight of the bumblebee.

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Farming for bumblebees

Much of the work that BBCT does is with farmers and other land managers, and we have a team of Conservation Officers working in the parts of the UK where the rarest bumblebees still live. In those areas, we can produce management plans to let them farmers know what seeds to sow, when the cut the resulting wildflowers back, and other aspects of managing their land in ways that will help the bees there. Part of this advisory work includes ‘Farm Days’, where we invite farmers to come along to other farms to see what the farmers there are doing that benefits bees.

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Finding the Blaeberry bumblebee

In one of my previous blogs I wrote about my search to find one of the more scarce species of bumblebee, the Blaeberry or Bilberry bumblebee (click here to read it). I particularly wanted to see this species because I’d never seen it before, and because of its striking appearance – having a bright orange abdomen.

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What happens to bumblebees in autumn?

Late summer is the time when most bumblebees begin to behave in usual ways that may seem alarming, but we’re here to shed some light on them. Instead of simply feeding upon flowers, they can now be seen mating, digging holes to hibernate in and slowly feeding upon flowers and dying en masse. What is the explanation for all of this? Read on to find out.

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