Anthony’s blog

The views, opinions and positions expressed within this blog are those of the author alone. The accuracy, completeness and validity of any statements made within this article are not guaranteed. We accept no liability for any errors or omissions.

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Where have all the bees gone?

We’re familiar now with the story that bumblebees and other bees have declined over the last few decades. But over recent weeks we’ve had a large number of calls and emails about a distinct lack of bees in places where they’re normally abundant; in many gardens and parks, the bees just don’t seem to be buzzing. Since late June, the number of bees in gardens seems to have dropped dramatically. At first I assumed this was a localised phenomenon, but with a growing number of enquiries coming in, I thought it was best to check with our Data Monitoring Officer, Richard Comont, the man who manages BBCT’s surveys. It turns out he had noticed and had heard the same thing!

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How can your school help bumblebees?

I do a few events with schools and find that teachers are generally enthusiastic about bumblebees and want to be able to spread the message to their students. One of our members, Philip Hughes, is the Headmaster of Crab Lane Primary School in Manchester. At that school they've made great efforts to educate the children about bees through interesting and creative projects. Read on to find out more in this guest blog from Philip...

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A golf course is not just a golf course

This week I have a special article written for my blog by Stephen Thompson from John O'Gaunt Golf Club in Bedfordshire. The golf club have been busy making their land good for bees. Read on to find out more...

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Being a BeeWalker

This week I have a special guest, Helen,  writing a blog article about her experiences as a BeeWalker - one of our volunteers who conducts regular bumblebee surveys. Read on to find out what she's been up to...

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Gardening Scotland 2014 - sucess!

I wrote a few weeks about my preparations for Gardening Scotland. This is Scotland’s largest gardening show, lasting three days, and we go to remind people of the plants which are good for bees. This year’s event was a great success, thanks in large part to our volunteers. Some of them have been helping us for several years and are now well experienced at speaking to the public. Others I had just met for the first time, but all of them brought their own knowledge (be it gardening, bumblebee expertise, event organisation or cheery chat) to the event. At some stages, we had all four of us talking to four different members of the public at the stall, such was the interest in bumblebees. So this blog article is dedicated to our volunteers, as we really couldn’t have done the show without them.

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