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Stay up to date with the Bumblebee Conservation Trust’s latest news and happenings right here.

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Rare bumblebee reaps the benefits of Scything.

Earlier this year the Bumblebee Conservation Trust was awarded £116,880 by the Heritage Lottery Fund to work with communities in Caithness to help protect the very rare, Great yellow bumblebee.

The distribution of Great yellow bumblebee has declined by 80% in the last century making it one of the UK’s rarest bumblebees, with the last mainland populations of this rare and enigmatic bumblebee found in Caithness and Sutherland.

Since April, the Bumblebee Conservation Trust has been engaging with local communities to raise awareness about the unique natural heritage of the area and working with a number of community groups to manage areas of wildflower meadows. Wildflower meadows offer bumblebees and other pollinators a great source of food but need to be carefully managed. Katy Malone, conservation officer for the Bumblebee Conservation Trust said, “Although larger scale meadows need to be managed with powered machinery, smaller meadows are often not accessible by large tractors, this led me to wonder if scything might be an option instead”.

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Bringing England’s wildlife ‘back from the brink’ of extinction

Bumblebee Conservation Trust joins forces to help protect our threatened wildlife. 

More than 100 species of England’s most threatened wildlife could be saved from extinction thanks to a new £4.6 million grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF).

HLF has approved the development stage and provided initial funding for ‘Back from the Brink’, a partnership project that brings together a range of conservation organisations to focus on protecting key threatened species – such as the Shrill carder bumblebee,  grey long-eared bat, pasque flower, sand lizard, and Duke of Burgundy butterfly – froextinction.

The programme is being run by Natural England and the Partnership for Species Conservation – a coalition of seven of the UK’s leading wildlife charities (Amphibian and Reptile Conservation, Bat Conservation Trust, Buglife, Bumblebee Conservation Trust, Butterfly Conservation, Plantlife, and the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds). By working together at sites across the country, ‘Back from the Brink’ will save 20 species from extinction and help another 118 species that are under threat move to a more certain future.

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Managed Bees Spread and Intensify Diseases in Wild Bees


UC Riverside-led research shows wild bees are harmed even when managed bees are disease-free.

RIVERSIDE, Calif. – For various reasons, wild pollinators are in decline across many parts of the world. To combat this, managed honey bees and bumblebees are frequently shipped in to provide valuable pollination services to crops. But does this practice pose any risk to the wild bees?

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Threat posed by ‘pollen thief’ bees uncovered

A new University of Stirling study has uncovered the secrets of ‘pollen thief’ bees - which take pollen from flowers but fail to act as effective pollinators - and the threat they pose to certain plant species.

Flowers often need pollinators, such as bees, to collect and transport pollen to fertilise other flowers and trigger fruit and seed production. In order to attract pollinators, flowers offer resources such as nectar, oils, and pollen in return.

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Ireland is buzzing as 68 organisations enlist to save our Bees

September 17th 2015 sees the launch of the All-Ireland Pollinator Plan, which identifies actions to help protect pollinators and the livelihoods of farmers who rely on their invaluable pollination service.

Waterford/Dublin, Thursday September 17th, 2015 – Sixty-eight governmental and nongovernmental organisations have agreed a shared plan of action to tackle pollinator decline and make Ireland a place where pollinators can survive and thrive.

The All-Ireland Pollinator Plan 2015-2020, published today, makes Ireland one of the first countries in Europe with a strategy to address pollinator decline and protect pollination services. The initiative has generated huge support and has culminated in agreement to deliver 81 actions to make Ireland more pollinator friendly.

The Plan identifies actions that can be taken on farmland, public land and private land. These include creating pollinator highways along our transport routes, making our public parks pollinator friendly and encouraging the public to see their gardens as potential pit-stops for our busy bees.

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