Shrill carder bee

The Shrill carder bee, Bombus sylvarum, is probably the UK’s rarest species of bumblebee.

In the 1900s, the Shrill carder bee was seen throughout most of England and Wales. Since then, the populations have declined quickly, and nowadays we only have about 7 separate populations left. These remaining populations are mostly in South Wales and England, where it still thrives on meadows and flower-rich grassland. Having such isolated populations is not ideal because it can cause inbreeding amongst closely related bees, so we are working with landowners to try to create more habitat that will protect existing populations and link them up.

Click here to read a case study of some of the work we are doing to help the Shrill carder bee.

 

Maps showing the distribution of the Shrill carder bee (Maps courtesy of BWARS)

“Few people realise just how important bumblebees are. They are charming little things and a pleasure to see, but they also do an essential job which many people take for granted. If bumblebees continue to decline then we face ecological turmoil. Join BBCT today and support their important work.”

Chris Packham
Naturalist, Television presenter
and BBCT President

Chris Packham
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